B&S Healthcare is carrying out a recall for prescription drugs and the UK’s medicines regulator, the MHRA, has issued an alert to patients and pharmacies

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A number of medicines are being recalled from pharmacies as a precaution (Credit: Pixabay)

Three types of prescription drugs imported to the UK are being recalled after it was found to have been stored incorrectly, which could have resulted in it being less effective in treating parkinson’s, epilepsy and heart patients.

Despite the products being believed to be “stable and legitimate”, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has undertaken a medical assessment of the products to determine whether there is any risk.

Patients taking medicines for Parkinson’s, epilepsy and blood clots are being warned to check if their prescriptions are part of certain batches of recalled medicines, which include Neupro, Vimpat and Clexane.

 

How can patients check for prescription drugs being recalled?

Patients can check the batch numbers on B&S Healthcare labelled packs, which are in Italian packaging, to see if their prescriptions have been affected.

MHRA said there is no evidence the drugs were tampered with and therefore, patients are advised to continue taking their medication.

Patients have been instructed to contact their GP practice to arrange a new prescription only if they have any of the affected products, and return the medicine to the supplier.

Dr Samantha Atkinson, director of the MHRA’s Inspection, Enforcement and Standards Division, said: “Making sure the medicines people and their families take are acceptably safe and effective is the primary role of the MHRA and is our highest priority.

“When we are made aware of potential risks to the security of the supply chain, the MHRA takes action to protect the public.

“We continuously strive to ensure the UK’s regulated supply chain remains one of the safest in the world.

In addition, six other medications are also being recalled at pharmacy level as a precautionary measure, including of inhalers, tablets and gels..

However, the risk of the drugs not working properly is very low, the MHRA said.

The regulatory body said if patients have any questions, they should speak to their GP or pharmacist.